Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Gulf of Mexico Resilient but Scarred; Sea Turtle Population at Decade Low

In the wake of the BP oil spill, the Associated Press reports the Gulf of Mexico is resilient, yet scarred.

After BP issued a 40-page report in March pronouncing the Gulf mostly recovered (and noting that less than 2 percent of the water and seafloor sediment samples exceeded federal toxicity levels), AP surveyed 26 marine scientists about two dozen aspects of the fragile ecosystem to see how the waterway has changed before the 2010 spill.

Among other species that have been in decline, the AP reports the endangered Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle’s population has declined to a decade low.

After the spill, Oregon State University professor Selina Saville Heppell said, the number of nests dropped 40 percent in one year in 2010.

“We had never seen a drop that dramatic in one year before,” she told AP. The population climbed in 2011 and 2012 but then fell again in 2013 and 2014.

Heppell said while there is not enough data or research to blame the spill, changing nesting trends could be due to many factors, including natural variability and record cold temperatures.

For more information on the report, click here.

Check out the Texas A&M University Press Gulf of Mexico Origin, Waters, and Biota series, which includes an economic snapshot of the Gulf of Mexico prior to the spill and looks at other facets of the Gulf: biodiversity, geology, and ecosystem-based management. The volumes are part of the Harte Research Institute’s landmark scientific series on the Gulf of Mexico.


Also, for more on the plight of sea turtles and meaningful related global volunteer opportunities, check out A Worldwide Travel Guide to Sea Turtles.



Monday, June 1, 2015

State of Texas Topped Number of Deaths Attributed to Flooding from 1995-2004

Experts on Thursday estimated that flooding across Texas could lead to insurance claims of more than $1.1 billion, topping the amount paid to policyholders in 2001 after the damage caused by Tropical Storm Allison, the Austin American-Statesman reported.

But, the aftermath of the most recent spate of floods is not the worst the state has seen.

 “Texans enjoy being number one in many fields,” writes Jonathan Burnett in the introduction to his 2008 book Flash Floods of Texas (Texas A&M University Press). “ Unfortunately, one area in which Texas is consistently foremost in the United States is the number of deaths attributed to flooding.”


From 1995-2004, Texas topped this list in seven of 10 years.

“One reason that Texas is typically near the head of this list is that the location and landscape of the Lone Star State make it prone to flash floods,” says Burnett. “Deluges at Del Rio in August 1998, in the Hill Country in October 1998, in Houston in 2001 and in the summer of 2007 in Marble Falls (where 12-18 inches fell in less than four hours) solidified Texas’ reputation as having some of the most flash flood-prone land in the world.

According to Burnett, no part of Texas is immune to flash floods; the state lies in the path of sources of copious moisture from the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean.

Current and ongoing flooding is hurting more than residences and businesses in the path of floodwaters.

Texas Parks and Wildlife is reporting the torrential storms that have continued to hammer much of the state for more than a week are now also leaving their mark on Texas’ State Park system. As of Wednesday, more than 50 state parks report some damage as a result of significant rainfall; about half of the sites are currently either closed or partially closed to the public due to flooding.

Houston has been one of the hardest-hit cities in the flooding, and it could see more storms in the next five days, according to the National Weather Service. And, areas farther north, including Dallas, could get another 2-4 inches of rain through Sunday.


For more information on the history of flash floods in Texas, check out Flash Floods of Texas.

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Does the History Channel's Texas Rising Miniseries Leave You Wanting More? Save 25% on Definitive Narrative of Texas Revolution

In 1836, west of the Mississippi was considered the Wild West, and the Texas frontier was viewed as hell on earth. Crushed from the outside by Mexican armadas and attacked from within by ferocious Comanche tribes, no one was safe.


Credit: History Channel
Credit: History Channel
The History Channel’s Texas Rising, a 10-hour event series airing this week and starring headliners such as Bill Paxton, Brendan Frazier, and Ray Liotta, dramatizes events following the Alamo’s fall. The series premiered Memorial Day to 4.1 million viewers.



Click here to watch a clip: https://www.whipclip.com/video/82fez

Credit: History Channel

For a more detailed narrative and analysis of the aftermath of the Alamo politically and militarily, check out Lone Star Rising: The Revolutionary Birth of the Texas Republic by William C. Davis. Use code 25A to purchase the book on the Texas A&M University Press website (www.tamupress.com) or call toll-free 800-826-8911 for a limited-time 25% discount.


First published in hardback in 2004 by Texas A&M University Press, Davis etches the characters of Sam Houston, Stephen F. Austin, and General Santa Anna – and the cultures they represented – in sharp and very human relief, as they carved out the republic whose Lone Star rose in 1836 and changed the course of a continent.


Davis, author of more than 40 books including Three Roads to the Alamo, is professor of history and director of programs for the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies at Virginia Tech.

Friday, January 23, 2015

Bat Mania

Pest-eating flyers face an uncertain future.
Did you know that bats are one of the most ecologically and economically important wildlife species worldwide, but also one of the most threatened?
In the United States, almost half of the 47 bat species are listed as endangered, threatened or sensitive at a federal or state level. In Texas, 23 bat species are listed as “species of greatest conservation need” in the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s Texas Conservation Action Plan.
An article in the latest issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine focuses on partnerships between TPWD and Bat Conservation International to prevent further bat species extinctions and help identify and protect significant bat areas to ensure lasting survival of the world's 1,300-plus bat species.
For more on Texas's four families of bat species, check out the Texas A&M Press book Bats of Texas by experts Loren Ammerman, Christine L. Hice, and David J. Schmidly.


Thursday, December 18, 2014

A&M Study: Texas State Parks Good for Economy

Tourists and visitors to Texas State Parks create an economic boost for nearby towns, generating income and jobs for local communities and growing the state economy, according to a recent study from Texas A&M University. In a nutshell, Texas State Parks:
  • Generate $774 million in retail sales annually,
  • Contribute $351 million in economic benefits, and
  • Create 5,800 jobs statewide.
“The take-away message from this study should be that the state park system is an important contributor to the Texas economy, particularly in rural areas and that the state’s net investment in parks is returned many times over as visitors travel to enjoy the outdoors and leave their dollars behind,” according to Dr. John Crompton, research team leader.
The study, also posted to the Texas Parks and Wildlife blog, surveyed nearly 14,000 state park visitors between March and June of 2014 and found that purchases made by park visitors result in greater wealth and employment in communities located near state parks.
Some of the findings:
  • Balmorhea — $2.3 million in value added; 50.3 jobs
  • Bastrop — $1.7 million in value added; 35.6 jobs
  • Big Bend Ranch — $1.9 million in value added; 27 jobs.
  • Cedar Hill — $3.1 million in value added; 41.7 jobs
  • Garner — $6.9 million in value added; 16.1 jobs
  • McKinney Falls — $883,146 in value added; 16.1 jobs
  • Palo Duro Canyon — $3.7 million in value added; 86 jobs
  • Pedernales Falls — $1.7 million in value added; 41.1 jobs
Read the full Crompton study.
For more on Texas's state parks, check out On Politics and Parks by George Bristol and Texas State Parks and the CCC: The Legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps by Cynthia Brandimarte with Angela Reed.


Friday, December 12, 2014

Biologists and Game Wardens Rescue Sea Turtles from Frigid Waters

When the weather turns cold for long periods of time, biologists and game wardens prepare for freezing water temperatures to affect wildlife along the coast.

In 2011, more than 800 green sea turtles were rescued during one of the longest cold spells in decades in South Texas. The good news is that the large number means that more of the federal and state protected turtles are making their home in Texas bays.

Texas Parks and Wildlife has this report: If you see a cold-stunned turtle floating in the water or lying on the shore, it may appear dead but chances are it is not. Experts say you should cover it with a towel and report it to the Sea Turtle Stranding & Salvage Network at 361-949-8173, ext. 226 or page the Animal Rehabilitation Keep at 361-224-0814.

Check out this video from Texas Parks and Wildlife to hear about ongoing rescue efforts. To find out more about sea turtle volunteer projects and opportunities in South Texas and around the world, check out A Worldwide Travel Guide to Sea Turtles by Wallace J. Nichols, Brad Nahill, and Melissa Gaskill.


Friday, November 14, 2014

University Press Blog Tour- Friday

Today's university press blog tour theme is "Follow Friday."

Today's blog tour is featuring: